Lifestyle

Rapping lawyer overcoming stereotypes to pursue dreams in courtroom, studio

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Posted at 10:57 AM, Nov 04, 2021
and last updated 2021-11-04 13:27:26-04

TAMPA, Fla. — During the day, you may find him defending clients in court as a skilled defense attorney. While at night, he could be on stage rapping at a club.

Tampa native Tony Halmon, AKA Tuqui, is defying stereotypes to pursue a career and hobby that typically don’t go together.

You won’t find Halmon rapping about drugs, gangs or guns.

“I didn’t live that life and there are a lot of kids who haven’t either and there are a lot of kids that shouldn’t only have to hear about that to bop to rap,” said Halmon.

His lyrics do focus on what he knows and loves and that’s being a lawyer for Hamilton, Miller and Birthisel.

“I like the theatrics, the performance part, which felt a lot like music in a sense, putting on a show,” said Halmon.

But he has often been told he can’t do both, rap and law.

“I don’t think there would have been a problem if I was singing opera or country,” said Halmon.

So, he’s out to prove everyone wrong with his new music video “Oh Lawd.”

“Charismatic gentleman making profits off of intelligence,” is just one of his fluid yet positive lyrics.

“And I just always thought that song was cool to really capture who I am as a person. I’m multi-faceted,” said Halmon. “I’m a professional person by day and somebody you may see on a TV screen someday rapping by night.”

This University of Central Florida graduate believes his rap background has even helped him in the courtroom.

“I found law is very similar you have to be able to think on your toes and be able to respond on the fly,” said Halmon. “I find it a way for me to connect with youth that I may not otherwise be able to just as a lawyer.”

He also hopes his story encourages other professionals to pursue their hobbies even though they may be unconventional.

“I think it changed the landscape of what rap even looks like because a lot of rappers don’t talk about positive things, not often,” said Halmon.

You can watch “Oh Lawd” on YouTube.

This story was originally published by Robert Boyd at WFTS.