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Meet the 10-year-old author shaping Black history through books

Scripps News is celebrating Black History Month by introducing you to a mover and shaker of today, someone making a difference and inspiring others.
Meet the 10-year-old author shaping Black history through books
Posted at 3:07 PM, Feb 01, 2024
and last updated 2024-02-01 15:08:58-05

She is just 10 years old, but she's already doing very big things.

As the chief inspiration officer of Dreamreacher Creative and a youth ambassador for the Children's Museum of Atlanta, Bailey Edwards is taking on significant roles and making a substantial impact by simply cultivating a dream.

Edwards has authored two books, including her latest, “Dreamreacher Diary.” 

The book is a collection of stories and poems written in a journal style by a character named “Bailey Dreamreacher,” in which she shares her adventures visiting friends who happen to be notable historical figures, all contributing to the celebration of Black history and culture.

"We explore and experiment with themes of afrofuturism, love, and joy. And also, there's no villain or antagonist in the book. So it allows for a full exploration of a happy and joyful theme without the need for a villain," Edwards told Scripps News. 

While the book was written by a 10-year-old, it's a book that has no age limit and could inspire older folks to not just learn new things, but also remind themselves that it is never too late to achieve your dreams. 

"I know I'm young and that I still have a lot of life to live. But the fact that I can help other young people be their best selves and reach their goals and their hopes and dreams. It just fills me up with so much warmth and happiness inside," said Edwards.

Dreamreacher Creative is an organization that collaborates with schools, companies, and community-based organizations to provide educational, wellness, and lifestyle content to children and families. Through this organization, Edwards has made it her mission to amplify messages that inspire growth and foster a positive mindset on life's journey.

"There's no need to look for approval from other people. If you love yourself and take the time to work on your skills and just be the best person that you can be, then you don't have to worry about what other people think about you or feel about you. And if you project that kind of energy, other people will gravitate towards it," said Edwards. 

Edwards aims to keep spreading positivity through Black history, to support children in building self-esteem and dealing with their emotions early on.

SEE MORE: Why do we celebrate Black History Month in February?


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