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'One of the most decent guys': What an ex-Secret Service agent remembers about George H.W. Bush

Posted: 12:56 AM, Dec 02, 2018
Updated: 2018-12-03 17:16:38Z

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — A former U.S. Secret Service agent who worked on a presidential detail for the late George H.W. Bush reminisced about the 41st president of the United States on Saturday after learning of Bush's passing.

Mauri Sheer spent two years with the Bush family during his presidency before he was appointed as a U.S. Marshal in the Kansas City area. 

Sheer, who worked in the Secret Service for nearly three decades, served six presidents.

"From Gerald Ford through George W. Bush," Sheer said.

But it was his time with George H.W. Bush, who died Friday night at his home in Texas, that he thought about most this weekend.

"He was constantly moving, and when he would move, he would move fast," Sheer said. "If you were working right ahead of him in the perimeter around him and you were right ahead of him, you'd have to be careful if you slowed down because he'd run you right over."

Sheer said that same energy went into his golf game. 

"They say he played golf almost like you play hockey," Sheer said. "He'd hit the ball and the ball's almost done moving and he's just constantly moving."

Sheer said the moment he'd never forget was the day Ronald Reagan was released from the hospital after he'd been shot. Sheer said he and Bush were running a 10-kilometer race that morning. 

"He didn't run as fast as he thought he was going to and he was pressed for time and he was behind and he was afraid he was going to miss it," Sheer said.

As usual, Bush didn't miss a beat.

Sheer said that's one thing he'll always remember. He also wanted others to know Bush was a fundamentally good person.

"The main thing that I think people should know about George H.W. Bush is that he's one of the most decent guys I'd ever been around," Sheer said.

He also will remember Bush as a generous man who cared deeply about others.

During the holiday season, Sheer said Bush would plan his schedule around his agents, so they could be home with their families for the holidays.