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As heatwave grips the west, health experts share heat safety reminders and warnings

This summer, the Centers for Disease Control, NOAA and the National Weather Service will conduct a national study looking at “urban heat islands” in 11 states, to see where extreme heat is occurring.
Posted at 4:23 PM, Jul 14, 2021
and last updated 2021-07-14 17:18:17-04

Hundreds of people have died in the Pacific Northwest and western Canada after multiple heat waves have gripped the area in record-breaking temperatures.

Meanwhile, summer has not quite peaked and hot temperatures are just heating up around the country.

Health experts are urging everyone to take simple precautions to stay safe, and know the symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

To stay safe and cool, the Red Cross recommends staying hydrated and wearing light-colored and loose-fitting clothing. Also, during the peak of the day, usually around lunchtime, stay out of the sun inside or in the shade.

Never leave animals or children alone in a hot car.

"Temperatures could reach 120-degrees in a vehicle very quickly,” said Caroline Fountain with the Red Cross.

Being exposed to extreme heat for prolonged periods of time can lead to heat exhaustion and become deadly as heat stroke.

Heat exhaustion symptoms include:

-heavy sweating

-cold, pale and clammy skin

-muscle cramps

If a person is experiencing these symptoms, get them to a cooler place and monitor for worsening or symptoms that last longer than an hour.

Heat stroke symptoms include:

-high body temperature: 104 degrees or higher

-hot, red, dry or damp skin

-fast or strong pulse

-headache, dizziness, or confusion

-nausea

If someone is experiencing these symptoms, they should be moved to a cooler place and emergency medical treatment called.