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New Orleans residents say resiliency defines their city as they recover from Ida

Ida damage
Posted at 4:45 PM, Aug 30, 2021
and last updated 2021-08-30 16:48:15-04

The fear of Hurricane Ida was too reminiscent of Hurricane Katrina for many residents in Louisiana.

Marius Williams was 15-years-old when he evacuated during the storm in 2005.

“On the radio, we heard people calling for help. When we heard that, we got real nervous,” Williams said of listening to the radio during Hurricane Ida.

With 150 mph winds upon landfall, Ida was one of the strongest storms ever to make landfall in the state. It arrived on Sunday, on the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed more than 1,800 people when it made landfall in 2005.

Even though Williams suffered damage to his home in the storm, he has never considered moving. Williams says it is resiliency that defines the city.

“It’s just who we are; we bounce back. All we’re going to do is pick up and party when Mardi Gras comes around,” Williams said.

Williams’ sentiment is one plenty of people feel around here. When asked why they stay, knowing another storm could put them in its bull's-eye during their lifetimes, they say this is their home, and leaving isn’t something many of them consider.

The storm caused significant damage to the local power grid, leaving the vast majority of New Orleans without electricity since Sunday evening.