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Passover, Easter, Ramadan: Celebrating faith through commonalities

Posted at 8:36 PM, Apr 15, 2022
and last updated 2022-04-15 21:06:09-04

The three Abrahamic faiths — Christianity, Judaism, and Islam — not only align on the calendar this year, but religious leaders say though they are different, there are commonalities.

"It's great when all the religions can come together, each in their own belief, but to promote peace in the world," Monsignor Chuck Kosanke of Most Holy Trinity Church in Detroit said.

Friday afternoon, Catholics took part in a Good Friday service at Most Holy Trinity Church. A series of traditions took place recognizing Jesus' crucifixion ahead of Easter Sunday, which is the day Christians observe his resurrection.

It's a busy weekend and month of religious observances, alongside Jews and Muslims who are recognizing Passover, which starts Friday and the holy month of Ramadan, respectively.

"Certainly Passover, which is the holiday of freedom, is about human dignity and it's a faith in God, that God believes all of us are dignified and deserve our freedom," Rabbi Asher Lopatin, executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council explained.

"I think Ramadan is also, it's different, it's a holiday of introspection. It's a holiday of holiness, but it's also a holiday — a month long holiday that Muslims feel enable them to be better people," Lopatin said.

Prayer, fasting and reflection are part of the focus during Ramadan.

Imam Sayed Muhammad Qazwini of the Islamic Institute of America said, "Islam is a continuation of Christianity and Christianity, the way we see it, was the continuation of Judaism. We recognize those previous religions and scriptures."

"So, when you have a moment like this when all these three religions are celebrating a religious event, this should remind us how much common we have we with each other. Many times, we tend to focus on the differences. Ya know, they're different from me," he explained.

Qazwini said when people see others as different, they sometimes dehumanize them, failing to see shared human values.

Kosanke said, "All of us believe that God created us to find our fulfillment in him however we believe that. That it's not just being a good person, which is wonderful, but it's being more than a good person. It's really that interior spiritual relationship with God."